K-12 Education

Pottawatomie County's K-12 education is comprised of eight Unified School Districts. Below is a map showing the territories of each USD. 
USD_Pott_County
EducationalAttainment
Source: Kansas Statistical Abstract 2017.

Six out of eight School Districts in Pottawatomie County have a higher graduation rate than the State of Kansas's average graduation rate of 87 percent.

Graduation Rate and Dropout Rate by School District in Pottawatomie County 2015-16

Source: Kansas Statistical Abstract 2017.
School District USD Graduation Rate Dropout Rate
Blue Valley
384 83.3% 0.00%
Kaw Valley 321 95.5% 0.57%
Manhattan-Ogden 383 76.8% 2.56%
Onaga-Havensville-Wheaton 322 96.6% 1.49%
Riley County 378 96.0% 0.31%
Rock Creek 323 92.3% 0.00%
Vermillion 380 95.6% 0.00%
Wamego 320 88.6% 0.30%

The pupil-teacher ratio is the number of students who attend a school divided by the number of teachers in the institution. Numerous sources argue that lower pupil-teacher ratios are better at teaching students complex subjects, such as physics, mathematics, and chemistry, than those with a higher ratio of students to teachers. Compared to the national average of approximately 16.1 and the state of Kansas pupil-teacher ratio of 15.5, Pottawatomie County reached a good ratio of 13.6 in 2017-18.

Pupil-Teacher Ratio in Pottawatomie County

Source: Kansas Statistical Abstract 2017.
School Year FTE Enrollment September 20 Total FTE PK-12 Teachers Pupil-Teacher Ratio
2014-15 3,824.6 290 13.2
2015-16 3,816.2 295 12.9
2016-17 3,853.2 294 13.1
2017-18 3,989.9 293.3 13.6

School Tax Rates, by County and School District, 2017-18

Source: Kansas Statistical Abstract 2017.
School District USD FTE Enrollment Total Assessed Valuation per pupil
Wamego 320 1,524.5 $59,062
Kaw Valley 321 1,109.9 $282,778
Onaga-Havensville-Wheaton 322 295.5 $81,350
Rock Creek 323 1060.0 $54,308

Growing up in poverty is one of the greatest threats to healthy child development. Poverty and financial stress can impede children’s cognitive development and their ability to learn. It can contribute to behavioral, social and emotional problems and poor health. According to the National Kids Count (a project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation to track the well-being of children in the United States), 14% of children (age 5-17) in Kansas were in poverty in 2016 and 2017. The line graph below clearly demonstrates the lower rate of poverty estimate in eight school districts of Pottawatomie County in 2016.

This indicator is included in the KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Index. Read the KIDS COUNT Data Book to learn more: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications.

EstimatesOfPoverty
Source: Kansas Statistical Abstract 2017.

Estimates of Poverty for 2016, Kansas School Districts, by County Children in Poverty Age 5-17 Related to Head of Household

Source: Kansas Statistical Abstract 2017.
School District USD Number Percent
Blue Valley (Randolph-Olsburg) 384 20 7.5
Kaw Valley 321 209 9.7
Manhattan 383 688 10.7
Onaga-Havensville-Wheaton 322 43 10.2
Riley County 378 80 9.9
Rock Creek 323 67 6.3
Vermillion 380 53 11.6
Wamego 320 130 8.3